Single Premier: Uzumaki – Screw Loose

UK slackers Uzumaki have returned with their second single “Screw Loose”, following on from the gloriously explosive “Tired. Growing up on THPS, Dookie, VX1000 footage and Malcom in the Middle, UZU is a product of these influences combined with a romance for Pixies, Sandbox and Nada Surf.

Speaking on the new single the band said:

“Screw Loose” reports on the youth of today, the dreams we chase and issues we face. However, there is a meaning within any song for the listener; the subjects in which we discuss may be interpreted by YOU (the listener) in whichever way you like. Carve your name into a tree and stick your chewing gum under the desk, for it is cool again to leave your Chucks untied, regardless of the risk.’

We are very happy to debut the emphatic new single, listen below!

Fiddlehead – Between The Richness Album Review

Run For Cover Records – 2021

The term ‘Supergroup’ more often than not is associated with one time projects that might seem interesting at the time but ultimately do not live up to the expectations or sounds of the band members main musical projects. This is not the case with Fiddlehead. After beloved emo group Title Fight announced their indefinite hiatus in 2017, hardcore fans were craving more bands that channelled Fugazi, Jawbreaker and Lifetime just as they did.

Formed by members of Have Heart, Basement, Youth Funeral and Big Contest, Fiddlehead’s first record Springtime and Blind, which came out in 2018, filled that niche incredibly well. I was lucky enough to catch them at the New Cross Inn on their December UK tour where they were welcomed with open arms and a fuck load of stage-dives along the way.

For vocalist Pat Flynn, grief has no expiry date, no time limit and absolutely no one’s place to tell someone to “Get over it”. Alluding to the passing of Flynn’s father, we have a life affirming intro to Fiddlehead’s second full length record on “Grief Motief”, a quote from poet E.E Cummings; “I carry your heart with me, I carry it in my heart. I am never without it. Anywhere I go, you go.” Following this, the Boston quintet launches into hard hitting instrumentation, Flynn giving us the long term symptoms grief we all must face when faced with a sudden loss of life; “Wake up and fall apart, sleep in and fall apart.” 

At face value, the songs follow a similar structure from last time, albeit with slower tempos in some areas, and Flynn occasionally unleashing his shouted vocals, not heard since members of Have Heart released a one off EP under the name ‘Free’ in 2015. The guitars still have that signature melancholic rock tone that feels familiar but just as impactful at the same time. Guitarist Alex Henery has a bigger role in terms of backing vocals, especially on “Get My Mind Right” and “Million Times”. Much like in Basement, his vocal contributions serve mostly to intensify the chorus rather than a dual singer-songwriter dynamic. They work incredibly well and help solidify the catchiness of each sticky vocal hook into aggressive chants when the group inevitably start playing live shows again.

As an academic himself, “Down University” is a recognition of the pressures in education to succeed painting an all too familiar picture in your head with the line; “Rising pressure and stress to measure up to standards set so high in your mind”. On the upside, Flynn urges the listener that all the prestigious American colleges listed are merely names, with the following mantra “You are worth more than your degree”. It’s a relatable tune that will undoubtedly bring comfort to those like myself who have struggled or are struggling to succeed and make their families proud. Shawn Costa’s drum fills are a notable highlight on this track, giving you the energy to jump off the nearest thing in your room and pretending that shows are still happening as normal.

“Stay in the Blue” and closer “Heart to Heart” show Flynn directly addressing his son Richard, who shares the same name as his late father. It is an optimistic side to the songwriting that feels warm and hopeful as well as deeply relatable. These songs are not only meant to be a time capsule of sorts but could also be passed on to anyone who’s recently brought a child into the world. These cuts also resonate the most emotionally, with gritty melodies and ear-worm worthy charm.

Ultimately, the world needed more Fiddlehead after Springtime and Blind, and we got more than we asked for, helping all of us to regain balance and catharsis in these uncertain times. I have no doubt in my mind that with time this will go down as one of the finest emo/post hardcore records of the 2020’s thus far.

Was Nailbreaker a mistake?

Photo by DEMIDOW Photography

From the depths of a bedroom in Rushden, Northamptonshire, George Hammond creates catchy, avant-garde art rap, influenced heavily by the likes of early 2000’s power electronics. We sat down with him not long after the release of his second EP Pain.

Who are you and what’s Nailbreaker’s deal?

I’m George, I’m a 21 year old musician. I’ve been making music under the name Nailbreaker since late 2018, mostly a mix of punk, rap, industrial and noise with some other influences thrown in. So far I’ve put out two EPs, a few singles and a megamix, done a few remixes and was gigging a lot until COVID happened. Since then I’ve been sat in my bedroom with a broken laptop trying to make disgusting noise rap. 

Describe what it’s like living in Rushden/Northamptonshire in general.

Rushden isn’t that interesting. It’s a bit rough and got rougher during COVID. I live just off the high street and it’s been a bit run-down after the shopping centre by the lakes opened up. The lakes are nice and there are a few good parks but the town’s so small you get used to it quick. Other than that there’s not a lot going on other than crime and a couple of pubs. Northampton is a bigger town so there’s a lot more to it. It’s cleaner, little more upmarket, still generally working class. It’s got a good DIY music scene with a lot of great bands and rappers and the town centre has a lot more stuff to do than Rushden does. Rushden’s where I feel most comfortable though, I know it better than anywhere else. 

What was the first ever concert you went to?

I think it was Jack White at O2 Academy Birmingham in 2012. Always been a really big White Stripes fan and Jack White was an early influence for how I approach music. It was a fucking sick gig and blew my mind as a 12 year old. The support act was this guy called Willy Moon and he was dogshit, but everything else was great. 

How did you get involved in producing electronic music yourself?

I got into producing myself purely out of necessity. My old band Acolytes had gotten a bit inactive and a couple of the members were off to uni so I needed a way to still gig and make music without other people. Our bassist, Bewlay, had been making his own music under the name Dylon Dean and was making the beats for it on Garageband on his phone, so I took inspiration from what he was doing and figured out how to record my own stuff on Garageband myself. I had no experience of production or beat-making or mixing or anything before then which is why the first two NLBRKR singles sound so lo-fi, so you can hear me gradually figuring out how to produce if you go through my discography chronologically. I eventually started making beats on my laptop but still with a pretty minimal setup, and sometimes I do still make some of my beats on my phone. It doesn’t really matter to me how I make the tunes, as long as I have some way of making them. 

You were recently featured on an Anthony Fantano live stream, what was going through your head as he listened to it & gave you advice?

It was a bit surreal, I’ve been watching Fantano’s reviews since 2015 and whether I always agree with him or not I respect his opinions because they’re generally quite well thought-out and nuanced. I knew as soon as it came up there would be a lot of “Bri’ish Death Grips” comments in the livestream. But it didn’t bother me considering Fantano’s fan we base will call anything from Show Me The Body to JPEGMAFIA “Death Grips”. I like Death Grips anyway so I don’t care. I was glad that Anthony seemed to like the track overall and he was very constructive in his feedback, and I had a lot of people reach out after to say they’d discovered my music through the stream and they really liked what I was doing. It’s always good when someone with that big a following gives small artists a platform and I’m happy that loads of people who would’ve never heard of me found out what I was doing because of Anthony giving it his thoughts. 

Describe a typical Nailbreaker live show.

Very physical. Confrontational. Probably not very COVID-friendly. Personally I use playing live as a way to get out any negative emotions I’ve got that I otherwise don’t know how to express. It’s not really a performance “for” other people if that makes sense, it’s something I do for my own peace of mind. That’s why I play with the same level of intensity whether the venue is packed or completely empty. I can be quite violent with myself and tend to take up most of the room instead of playing just onstage but that’s not something I put any thought into, I just lose myself in the music and let my primal instincts take over. Not being able to play live admittedly hasn’t been great for me mentally because a lot of feelings I would purge in my gigs which I haven’t been able so when shows come back I’ll definitely be more at peace. 

What are some of your favourite power electronics artists?

Deathpile, Prurient, Genocide Organ, Dreamcrusher, Pharmakon, Knifedoutofexistence, Whitehouse and Hunting Lodge. This is also the first time I’ve been asked about my taste in power electronics in an interview and I hope it’s not the last. 

Often, artists from the P.E genre tend to tackle transgressive and taboo subjects, often far more to the extreme than say metal or punk sub genres. What inspires you to write about the themes in your songs?

I guess similar to my approach to live shows it’s really just purging the feelings I have that I don’t know how else to express. The reason the themes of depression, suicide, anti-capitalist politics or just taking the piss out of stuff come up is because those are whatever I’m feeling or thinking about at the time of writing. It’s not always doom n’ gloom, sometimes I’ll have lyrics that I write just to make myself laugh. Whatever I write though is always authentic to whatever I’m going through at the time. 

When the pandemic becomes more manageable/comes to an end, what do you hope to achieve musically and personally?

Musically I’m gonna keep doing what I’m doing pandemic or not. A lot of people say shit like “music’s the only thing I know how to do” and it always comes off cheesy but music is for real the only thing I know how to do. While I can’t gig right now, the pandemic isn’t stopping me from recording so I’ve got EP3 and a full-length mixtape on the go at the minute, as well as demoing new material for Sharkteeth Grinder (the mathcore band I play guitar in). 

Personally, I’m trying to improve my health – physical and mental – and I’m gonna keep working on that. My knees are fucked from throwing myself around at gigs all 2019, the kneecaps float and pop out of place constantly, so I’ve been working on getting some strength and stability back and hopefully they’ll be in much better shape before gigs are back how they used to be. 

Do you still believe that Nailbreaker was a mistake?

It depends. When it comes to my knees, head, hearing, back and bank account then yes, a terrible mistake. It gives me something to do though. 

Tell us the story behind the closing track Nailbreaker Vs Nailbreaker.

I made the beat in late 2019 intending to use it for a different release which I never finished. I ended up coming to not like it as much so it got put on the shelf for a while. I listened to it again as I was recording Pain and I remembered what I liked about it in the first place so I decided to stick it on the EP. Lyrically, it’s about allowing self-destructive tendencies to get in the way of your own progression, how we sometimes use pain as a motivator and source of inspiration yet have to constantly navigate how we deal with pain so it doesn’t consume our existence. The vocal sample at the track comes from an Instagram story Lewis from the band BLOOD-VISIONS uploaded a couple of Halloweens ago where he was walking home drunk in corpse paint upset about how nobody in Northampton would accept him for what he truly is, a black metal guy in 2019. The video’s since become legendary and I’ve had the audio saved on my laptop for a while looking for an excuse to honour it, I’m glad I finally got to shoehorn it in. Lewis was happy to be included too. 

What’s the response been like to Pain so far?

Actually better than I expected. I didn’t expect it to be universally hated obviously but I’ve had a lot of people tell me how much they love it and that it’s my best work yet so the support has been sick. I’m always surprised when BBC Introducing plays my shit anyway so it was cool to see them get behind it too. I am really grateful to everyone who’s given any of my music my time – as I’ve said I make music solely for myself so the fact that anyone else gets anything out of it is humbling. Because the music comes from a very dark place it seems like it’s resonated with a lot of people. Obviously we all had a shit 2020 and I think most peoples’ mental health had gone to shit by the end of the year, and I’ve had a number of people tell me the EP reflected the state of mind they were in or reflects what living in 2021 feels like or whatever. This music exists to help me cope, anyone else getting anything out of it is a bonus. 

Pain EP is out now, available to buy here.

Slow Crush are leading the way for a new generation of shoegazing

Like soaking your head in a warm bath of water, the Belgian group are well crafted in the art of abrasive immersion. Formed from the ashes of various hardcore projects, Slow Crush formed in 2017. Since then, they have toured with well admired scenes across the world such as Gouge Away, Torche, Tennis System and had their first EP Ease distributed by US based label Deathswish Records. We caught up with vocalist and guitarist Isa Holiday about their ventures at home during the start of the COVID 19 Pandemic.

You had so much planned 12 months ago, what have you been up to in the meantime?

Slept! Haha, we had such a big schedule for 2020. We had just gotten back from a US tour, when we sort of heard the news creeping in about the pandemic potentially ruining plans to tour Italy, which was the next stop. So we were watching the news, and seeing all of the countries slowly on our tour schedule just sort of disappear. It was like, “Okay, maybe it’s best to just stay home”. Plans for recording  also needed to be rescheduled because  wherever we wanted to go initially, that just wouldn’t have been able to happen. Eventually we found that the perfect fit and finally, we were able to do that in January. So yeah, we were just using our time productively to work on that while being stuck at home.

Logistically, how did you manage to come up with ideas for recording whilst everyone was initially apart from each other?

With the whole introduction of zoom as well as WhatsApp message groups and everything like that it gave us the opportunity to share ideas over the internet. I think the pandemic did cause people to get a lot more creative or, or just think about how you can go about things differently, because stuff still needs to be done. You can’t just sit at home, although the government would want you to.

Are there any ideas that you’ve sat on for a while?

We have tonnes of ideas that don’t all come into fruition to make it onto an album. It just depends on the creativity flow, right. Being stuck at home can work in both ways in that respect, because it could spur a lot of inspiration, but then it can also be very restricting if you’re only seeing the same four walls over and over. 

What was your favourite tour of your career thus far?

They’re all so much fun and they’re all very different! I think all of the tours have had something memorable about all of them. Just because crazy shit goes on all the time that you can’t predict. But I think that one tour that I really enjoyed a lot was the Soft Kill tour. That was towards the end of last year as well. The whole tour crew were really fun. Their merch guy like he and I, we would just be dancing every night and we promised ourselves before heading out on tour that we would do cartwheels every night, but we never got around to it. They got me on stage to play bass on one of their songs for half of the tour. So it was just really fun. But like I said, every tour is fun. Especially now you look back when you can’t do it. And yeah, it’s just amazing to get to know all of these people, like all of people from from the other bands that you’re talking with, and then just being in different places and learning or seeing things that you wouldn’t see on this side of the world.

It’s interesting that you bring up Soft Kill as they are essentially a group of hardcore kids that ended up making heavy dreampop. Do you feel like there are similarities with how you started Slow Crush?

The style that we’re playing is sort of a kind of lighter version of what we sort of grew up listening to and what we grew up playing. But then again, we do incorporate some little hints to hardcore now and then. 

What was the first shoegaze band you ever saw live? 

I saw Nothing and Newmoon together in 2016. Hardcore and shoegaze go well together because its all organised chaos! I think Nothing actually ended up renting our van at some point as well. Around that time we had just kind of quit our doom metal band and we were considering continuing in that style, but with me on vocals. So then, I started like listening to a lot of Pity Sex. And like bands like Mumrunner, and Jaguar. I got the inspiration for my vocal sound and range sort of fits well with their style of singing. They all have that shoegazey sound although Pity Sex were a little bit more punky or raw I suppose. That’s that is the inspiration that led to the beginning of Slow Crush. 

What other music do you listen to besides shoegaze?

I haven’t personally sort of looked out for new music for a while, just because I’ve just been so busy with with, like, the day to day work and everything else. So I suck. But, um, but something that that I have discovered recently is Cassandra Jenkins. It’s very kind of soft, easy going stuff. I’ve also been going back to old hardcore like In My Eyes whenever I go for a run, which hasn’t been for a while. I know that when I used to drive into work, I would put on Carry On. And that would get me pumped to like, start the day and this is something relatively new, I suppose. But the Curse These Metal Hands song “High Spirits” is very motivational song. 

Tell me about the recent indoor live stream show you performed earlier this year?

The Ancienne Belgique is one of the most renowned venues in Belgium. I have been to numerous concerts there. I think even my first concert that I went to without parents was there, which I think was Green Day. It’s like a huge hall with balconies as well, which is quite intimidating if you’re standing there to an empty room. I imagine it’s more intimidating when there are 1000s of people there! I’m kind of glad that that was my first experience on that stage to an empty hall. It’s a dream to be able to play there. It was also the same venue that we played the last show of the Soft Kill tour in but we played a smaller room. I haven’t seen any images yet, but  they are prepping everything right now and just editing everything together.

What is the most personal song you have ever written?

From Aurora the title track is quite meaningful to me. It was written about a friend who was having a hard time with a breakup and everything like that, so it’s kind of my tribute to her. That’s pretty close to my heart. “Tremble” is another good one. It is our protest song, being a voice for the voiceless. Whether it’s animal rights or any other injustice that the government throws at us. 

If you could change one thing about the music industry what would it be?

It would be great if all venues shared the same hospitality as one another. I’m not being a dick, but you should at least offer a drink to a touring band regardless of how big they are. After the pandemic ends it would also be great to see more government support for the music industry and the arts in general. Don’t get me started on Brexit either. It’s made it so much more difficult for touring bands to come to the UK and vice versa unless you’re huge. In Belgium we just received the news yesterday that the biggest festival in the country is not going to take place this year. Everything is just postponed to next year. They’re still debating whether the late summer festivals can take place. If any festival booked, the bill is going to be local bands, because travelling is just going to be almost impossible until the vaccinations spread like wildfire.

Slow Crush’s AB Session will be streaming on April 24th, tickets available here.

The live audio will be released on April 25th, available to pre-order here now.

Julien Baker – Little Oblivions Album Review

Matador Records – 2021

It’s overwhelming to think of how much the world has changed since Julien Baker’s sophomore record Turn Out The Lights. Starting out tied to the contemporary American emo scene of the 2010’s, Baker along with her contemporaries Phoebe Bridgers and Lucy Dacus have all moved past their slowcore, quaint indie folk origins and created instrumentally rich records full that have propelled their careers forward. 

A phrase floating around on Twitter before this album came out was “depression, but with drums” and if i’m being honest, Little Oblivions fits that description nicely. There is of course a lot more depth to it than that but the added percussion, especially on tracks like “Bloodshot” and “Ringside” make you wonder what Baker’s music would have been like had this been the norm from the start? The percussion ranges from hard hitting acoustic snare beats and cymbals to minimalistic loops that you feel like were added in with painstaking attention to detail. 

Opener “Hardline” blasts your eardrums with a multitude of vibrant instrumentation choices, coupled with Baker’s acceptance of regression and struggles with addiction in the lyrics, making this a strong track to set off the album. It’s the first gut punch of many on Little Oblivions, with lyrics like “I’m telling my own fortune, something I cannot escape, I can see where this is going, but I can’t find the brake”. On her first release Sprained Ankle she claimed that she wished she could write songs about anything other than death, and even if it’s not always literally about death, Little Oblivions in a way has become a self fulfilling prophecy of sorts.

However, the expectations ‘Hardline’ sets for the rest of the record are hard to top. When Baker relied solely on her guitar and subtle ornamentations in her previous work, this made her songs a lot more memorable. In this case, it feels like there’s almost too much going on with Little Oblivions for tracks to always necessarily stand out on their own. “Faith Healer” and “Repeat” are the biggest departures from Baker’s sound, and despite some hard hitting, self deprecating lines, the by the numbers indie instrumentation becomes more of a distraction than enhancing the listening experience. The gospel inspired backing vocals on “Favor” provided by her Boygenius bandmates work well in a more stripped back context, even if it’s because the acoustic guitar lead is reminiscent of early Elliott Smith. 

Case in point, “Song in E” sees Baker reaching almost cinematic heights with lavish piano notes, each key hit with further deliberation than the last. It doesn’t need a full backing ensemble to get its point across and would feel unnecessary if this were the case. She holds nothing back expressing this desire for self punishment and validation through that rather than whoever she’s hurt giving her nothing in return, even if from the outside that seems like the mature option; “I wish you’d hurt me, it’s the mercy I can’t take.” 

Fans who wanted a fuller experience of Baker’s blunt autobiographical ventures will have a lot to sink their teeth into on Little Oblivions, alongside being able to channel cynical viewpoints and criticisms of herself into a form of empowerment rather than self pity or cringe. For the most part Baker is strongest when the instrumentation is minimal as too many of the songs on here don’t quite hit the same consistency of quality, despite the earnest songwriting. This is her biggest sounding album yet, but doesn’t always manage to make a lasting impression.

Hot New Single: The Mums – Summer Sauna

Photo by Jack Pulman

Remember concerts? Remember being able to drink with your mates in the sun without the fear of catching a deadly virus? We don’t. But The Mums certainly do.

Comprised of power couple Jack Pulman (Birdskulls) on guitar and vocals, singer Emily Brown and Luke Ellis (Muncie Girls), The Mums are a breezy indie punk project full of bright guitar riffs and fuzzy basslines. The Exeter trio recorded an EP of songs yet to be announced quietly over last year through lockdown, with ‘Summer Sauna’ being their first offering.

‘Summer Sauna’ gracefully takes you by the hand with its sticky opening melody. Pulman and Brown’s vocals go together like cookies and cream, with Ellis’s abrasive drum fills giving off heavy Pity Sex and Lemuria vibes respectively. Loud and soft, juxtaposing rapidly between sungazing without a care in the world and headbanging. With a chorus that blesses you like an unexpected hit of dopamine, we can’t wait to hear what else The Mums have in store for us in the future.

You can listen to ‘Summer Sauna’ below.

Yuck call it quits

Image result for yuck band

10 years after the release of their debut album ‘Yuck’, guitarist Max Bloom announced through the band’s social media channels that they will ‘no longer be releasing music or touring together.’

Formed in 2009 from the ashes of Cajan Dance Party, the London group mixed elements of indie rock, shoegazing, and noise rock. They signed to Fat Possum Records and recorded their first album in 2010 at Max Bloom’s parents house. The band supported the likes of Tame Impala and Unknown Mortal Orchestra and received critical acclaim from Pitchfork and NME.

A year later, frontman and rhythm guitarist Daniel Blumberg left the group in 2013 to follow his own solo career. Yuck would go on to release two further albums, ‘Glow & Behold’ in 2013 and their final release ‘Stranger Things’ in 2016.

Their final performance together was with Powerplant, Lewsberg and Norman at Moth Club on 14th October 2019.

You can read the band’s statement below.

Black Country, New Road – For The First Time Album Review

Ninja Tune – 2021

Contrary to the album’s title, this is not the first time that keyboardist May Kershaw, saxophonist Lewis Evans, guitarist Luke Mark, drummer Charlie Wayne bassist Tyler Hyde and violinist Georgia Ellery have performed together. However, it is in-fact the first time they have performed under this particular name. It is important to mention this before anyone moans about them appearing out of nowhere or being ‘industry plants’. Nevertheless, BCNR have made a name for themselves as part of the South London gig scene over the last two years, joining the ranks of Squid, Black Midi and Goat Girl and relentlessly working despite the obvious COVID restrictions.

Instrumentally it would be easy to lazily pile them in as Slint worship (Which is referenced on “Science Fair” since music journalists refused to shut the fuck up about comparisons towards them.) but the outcome tends more to veer towards acts like Duster, Low or even the later material from The World Is A Beautiful Place and I Am No Longer Afraid To Die. This of course is only a framework for trying to define what they soundlike because they’ve already formed their own sound without needing to adhear to any lazy Pitchfork worship.

In keeping with being unconventional, the opener is a five minute organic jam, full of lingering repetition yet accessible beats and sharp melodies. In a live scenario you could only imagine how much this would hype an audience up before the collective takes the stage. It’s a reminder of that quote from Howard Moon of The Mighty Boosh that goes; “You hate jazz?, you fear jazz with its lack of rules.” This is exactly what he was on about.

Frontman Issac Wood’s delivery on many of these tracks comes across as wobbly, aggressive and unhinged. You can feel a sense of dread and anxiety coursing through the phrasing of these narratives, ranging from mildly sorrowful on “Athens, France” to roaring full blown melt downs later on in the record. “Track X” and “Science Fair” are the most narratively sound and perhaps as a result bring the highest sense of individual identity. Ironic considering that the unpredictability of where these songs take you can make it hard to appreciate what role each member will play, which often requires multiple listens to achieve full appreciation.

One minute you might be lulled with a pretty guitar line or alluring violin section, the next it might feel like someone’s stabbed you in the gums with a screwdriver. Wood’s lyrics often feel like someone writing fragments of thoughts on the iPhone notes app before forgetting what they were actually thinking about. Like watching a David Lynch film, trying to always find clear meanings in each sentiment will ultimately frustrate anyone trying to read between the lines with notions such as; “Now all that I became must die before the forum thread, the cursed vultures feed and spread the seeded daily bread.” 

Fans who’ve been following BCNR for a while may understandably be disappointed that two of the six tracks on here are reworked versions of previous singles, however there are polishes and vocal inflections that at times can change the songs overall delivery. On ‘Sunglasses’ for example, the warm, fuzzy intro chords leaning into the earworm melody is far more effective the the single version in the context of listening to this record in its entirety. Harrison sounds more like he’s accepting his fate of becoming a boring cunt like the father of his partner rather than screaming in denial. Even the line “The absolute pinnacle of British engineering, I am so ignorant now”, oozes with melodic allure rather than a sardonic quip. As the cacophony of instruments blend into a breakdown and tempo change, his character morphs into the very same normie that he feared he would turn into, all whilst failing at any attempts to hide his insecurities. Think of that sunglasses emoji, but with tears streaming down its face. 

8 minute closer ‘Opus’ is by far the most theatrical of offerings on here. It finds its balance between sounding like a sadcore indie offering in the softer sections and a mariachi band set on fire in the louder parts. The result is a bleak, tumultuous journey where our character reaches the end of his relationship. Evans saxophone work here is flawless, building up tension in the slower sections as it becomes a fiery release between each verse. With Harrison’s final, broken vocals with the lines “What we built must fall from the rising flames”, the sentiment that nothing is built to last comes to its conclusion. The final melody in particular resonates and sticks to your very core.

Rather than trying to guess what Black Country, New Road will do next, it’s probably best to enjoy this meandering experience without any predictions. For The First Time is a phenomenal debut that will hopefully secure the group’s future for years to come.